Vi essentials kindle ebook free today from Amazon

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If your interested in learning Vi you can pick up the kindle edition of “Vim and Vi Tips: Essential Vim and Vi Editor Skills” for zero dollars. Today only apparently.

Get it here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004JF4NOQ

Unix in your browser

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Emacs in your browser

Love the cloud but worried about not being able to use emacs? Google docs not cutting the mustard? Has decades of emacs left your fingers permanently locked into twisted claws, useful only for entering emacs keyboard shortcuts? Well stop worrying emacs is now in the cloud, edit all your cloud based documents with Ymacs, a javascript implementation of the venerable text editor. Continue reading

The Command Line III: Essential tips for living on the command line

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This section is a bit of an interlude in our unix journey. Instead of addressing concepts such as file systems and the like, in this section we are going to look at some must know tips to make your life easier on the command line. You should have noticed by now that there is a lot of typing involved in the command line and, as any good programmer would rather write a tool once than continually repeat a common chore, there are mechanisms available to us on the command line to reduce the typing load. The following tips are essential to efficiency on the command line and will make your life easier.

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The Command Line II: Shells and getting around the filesystem

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Welcome to the second post. In this post we are going to leave all the philosophising behind and get down to learning some real command line skills. So strap yourself in for a whirlwind guide to moving around the file system; creating, moving and copying files; setting permissions and getting basic information about your system all from the spartan interface of the Unix command line. Hopefully at the end you’ll get a glimpse of the awesome power that this interface places at your finger tips and maybe inspire you to learn more about this amazing tool.

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The Command Line I: Operating systems and Unix

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Although this blog will generally be presenting hands-on, technical tutorials on how to perform various bioinformatic tasks, this first post turned out to be a bit more philosophical than I originally thought it would be. The starting point for a look at Unix is necessarily an explanation of operating systems; what they are, what they do and what they can do for us. In the course of trying to answer these questions I got a little carried away and the result is a first post with almost no technical details. Nonetheless, what I hope this post achieves is to give some context for latter posts and to introduce, at a very basic level, some of the issues that dictate the way we interact with computers the way we do. The other aim is to show that computing doesn’t begin and end with Windows, that there are other ways of doing things, and for a lot of tasks these ways are much more efficient. This blog is aimed at people with limited exposure to Unix, programming and bioinformatics and one of the hardest things to do when learning something like Unix is `unlearning’ the way things are done on your PC and wrapping your brain around a different concept of computing. This can take a while, but once the penny drops things all start making sense. This post is about helping that penny drop.

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